December 4, 2023

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Best Entry-Level Car Paint Sprayer Kit

DeVilbiss 802342 StartingLine HVLP Gravity Spray Gun Kit

On Sale

802342 StartingLine HVLP Gravity Spray Gun Kit

1

Best Entry-Level Car Paint Sprayer Kit

DeVilbiss 802342 StartingLine HVLP Gravity Spray Gun Kit

Now 18% Off

Credit: DeVilbiss

This beginner set from DeVilbiss offers a great value for a kit. It comes with two different sized sprayer options (cups are 600cc and 250cc), adjustment knobs for optimizing spraying and other common features (various tip sizes, cleaning tools, etc.). Online reviewers note the importance of ensuring a tight seal to avoid any leaks.

2

Best Car Paint Sprayer 2-Stage Spray System

Fuji Spray 2203G Semi-PRO 2-Gravity HVLP Spray System

2203G Semi-PRO 2-Gravity HVLP Spray System

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Best Car Paint Sprayer 2-Stage Spray System

Fuji Spray 2203G Semi-PRO 2-Gravity HVLP Spray System

Credit: Fuji Spray

A step-up in terms of performance, the Fuji Spray can handle more serious hobbyist work and can be used on a variety of surfaces beyond automobiles. It offers either a 400cc or 1000cc bottom feed cup and six different aircap set sizes, and a long 25 foot hose to allow for easy movement while spraying. The quality build makes it a bit heavier than other selects here, but the combination of quality, ease of use and finish results outweigh that.

3

Best Beginner Car Paint Spray Gun

Yattich 700W High Power HVLP Spray Gun with 5 Copper Nozzles

700W High Power HVLP Spray Gun with 5 Copper Nozzles

3

Best Beginner Car Paint Spray Gun

Yattich 700W High Power HVLP Spray Gun with 5 Copper Nozzles

Credit: YATTICH

This electric car paint sprayer comes with five copper nozzles and allows for three different types of spray patterns by adjusting the flow control knob. It can be used on a host of different projects, including automotives like cars and bikes, but also outdoor items like wooden furniture.

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4

Best Multi-purpose Car Paint Sprayer

HomeRight C800766, C900076 Finish Max Paint Sprayer HVLP Electric Spray Gun

On Sale

C800766, C900076 Finish Max Paint Sprayer HVLP Electric Spray Gun

4

Best Multi-purpose Car Paint Sprayer

HomeRight C800766, C900076 Finish Max Paint Sprayer HVLP Electric Spray Gun

Now 51% Off

Credit: HomeRight

This relatively lightweight electric car paint sprayer is great for a variety of projects, from refinishing interior items like kitchen and cabinets to larger projects like automotive upgrades. Users can find the optimal paint output by adjusting the rotating flow control knob. You can upgrade to the Super Finish Max if you’re looking at doing larger projects (2 to 3 gallons vs. 1 to 2 gallons for this product) or need additional spray tips.

5

Best Mini Car Paint Spray Gun

Neiko 31207A HVLP Mini Gravity Feed Air Spray Paint Gun

Amazon’s Choice

31207A HVLP Mini Gravity Feed Air Spray Paint Gun

5

Best Mini Car Paint Spray Gun

Neiko 31207A HVLP Mini Gravity Feed Air Spray Paint Gun

Credit: NEIKO

One of Amazon’s Choice products due to its low cost and solid ratings (over 4,000 4-star or higher reviews), this Neiko automotive paint spray gun comes with a 125cc paint container and a 1.0mm nozzle on the mini set. You can adjust the paint flow with a simple knob, making it suitable for a range of small projects or quick touch-ups.

6

Best LVLP Paint Gun

Aeropro Tools R500 LVLP Air Spray Gun

R500 LVLP Air Spray Gun

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Best LVLP Paint Gun

Aeropro Tools R500 LVLP Air Spray Gun

Credit: AEROPRO

This beginner spray gun comes with a 600cc plastic cup and 1.3mm needle and an additional 1.5mm and 1.7mm cap + needles. Paired with a small air compressor, it will still remain relatively lightweight for projects ranging from simple automotive painting jobs to furniture finish painting.

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How we choose the best car paint sprayers

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The experts at the Good Housekeeping Institute regularly vet and review a variety of auto products from car covers and dash cams to car vacuums — and even cars themselves. To compile our list of the best car paint sprayers and provide information about how to choose a paint gun for your car, our experts leaned on expertise from our brother publication Car and Driver‘s Guide to Car Spray Painting, researched top brands, read through dozens of five-star reviews and considered factors like price, which tools are included in each kit, ease of use and application and more.

What is a car paint sprayer?

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Also referred to as an automotive spray gun or an automotive paint gun, a car paint sprayer is a tool that helps you apply paint to your car in a professional, uniform manner. It makes it easy and fast to spray paint over a large area without looking spotty and allows you to get into all the angles and curves that are built into your car. Whether you’re looking to give your entire car a completely fresh coat or want to paint small details on your vehicle (think a phrase or image), a spray paint gun can help make your paint job look less like an amateur DIY project and more like an expert job. In general, it will also cost less than hiring a professional to do a paint job for your vehicle.

What to look for when shopping for the best car paint sprayer

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Once you’ve decided to move forward with painting your own car, there are a few things to consider when picking out the best car paint sprayer for you. These include the type of paint sprayer (HVLP or LVLP) and what feed is best for you (siphon vs. gravity feed). Then look at nozzle size and if you’ll need additional accessories.

✔️ Types:

  • HVLP paint sprayers (high-volume, low-pressure sprayers) rely more on high volume of air rather than high pressure to create a soft spray that makes it the best automotive paint gun for beginners (which is why all but one of our picks above is HVLP). But this is one of the most popular types of sprayers for a few different reasons beyond that. For one, it has a good transfer efficiency, meaning a considerable quantity of the paint you spray will make it directly from the paint gun onto the vehicle you’re painting, and you’ll be able to use less paint and fewer coats to get that professional-looking finish. HVLP sprayers can be powered by either a turbine or a compressor. A turbine system uses fans to provide the air required for a HVLP sprayer and doesn’t require you to purchase a (sometimes quite expensive) compressor so therefore it’s more compact. Compressor sprayers, on the other hand, can be a bit bulkier and require you to buy a compressor to use, but are often more durable and longer-lasting, so they are a better fit for professionals or those that will be using their spray gun frequently.
  • LVLP paint sprayers (low-volume, low-pressure sprayers) overall are better for professionals who want to get the job done quickly, and have the training to do it efficiently. Not only are LVLP sprayers a bit speedier than their HVLP counterparts, but the paint coating can also dry faster, making it easier to get in, get out and get back on the road. If you’re a beginner, an LVLP may not be the best option for you since it requires more experience and training to achieve favorable results.

✔️ Feed style:

  • Siphon-feed sprayers (also know as conventional style) store paint at the bottom of the sprayer, tend to be larger and carry more paint, and are more durable than gravity-feed sprayers. Due to this, they’re bulkier than their gravity-feed counterparts and use air pressure via a compressor to siphon the paint out of the sprayer.
  • Gravity-feed sprayers work with gravity by storing the paint at the top of the paint sprayer and then directing it to the sprayer and out onto your car. This allows it to utilize less air pressure than siphon style, but this also means if you try to use your sprayer upside down or tilted, the paint won’t be able to flow to the nozzle as easily and it will be harder to spray evenly.

✔️ Nozzle size: Smaller nozzles are better for lighter coats of paint while larger nozzles will be able to accommodate heavier coats. Primers tend to be thicker and need a larger nozzle while base coats and clear coats need a slightly smaller nozzle.

✔️Additional accessories: Some car paint sprayer kits come with multiple sizes of nozzles, which makes it easy to apply everything from the primer to the clear coat without having to purchase any extra pieces. Similarly, some kits come with cleaning brushes to help you get every bit of paint out of the machine after each use and paint cup lids for storing paint for the next application.

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How to use a spray gun to paint a car

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Using a car paint sprayer involves a bit of a learning curve so don’t be discouraged if your first paint job doesn’t turn out perfectly (in other words, practice on something else before your car!). First, you’ll want to find the appropriate paint sprayer for your vehicle as the right equipment can make all the difference. Another thing to keep in mind is that while you’ll likely still do a fairly good job with a cheaper sprayer, it may require a bit more finesse than an absolute beginner might be equipped for.

Before you start, take a look at the user manual to familiarize yourself with the exact spray gun that you’ve purchased and how to operate all the controls — it may seem obvious, but this a step that shouldn’t be skipped since you may risk damaging your car’s finish if not used properly. For the same reason, it’s also a good idea to practice on something that isn’t as valuable as your car, say, a piece of scrap metal or cardboard. In terms of the technique: You’ll want to keep the sprayer at a uniform distance away from the car (usually between 4 to 10 inches but consult the user manual for specifics) and use consistent movements to ensure that everything is painted in the same manner.

Why trust Good Housekeeping?

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Headshot of Jamie Spain

Parenting & Pets Reviews Analyst

Jamie (she/her) is a parenting and pets reviews analyst at the Good Housekeeping Institute, where she spends her time testing, researching and writing about pet and family products. Prior to starting at GH in 2021, she worked at BuzzFeed and People, covering a combination of product reviews and lifestyle content. She’s a graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and psychology and a master’s degree in journalism.

 

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